Paris to limit speeds to under 20 mph over entire city

france-paris-zone

The just-elected new Mayor of Paris, Madame Anne Hidalgo, has prepared a revolutionary sustainable mobility project whereby virtually all of the streets of the city will be subject to a maximum speed limit of 30 km/hr.

The only exceptions in the plan are a relatively small number of major axes into the city and along the two banks of the Seine, where the speed limit will be 50 km/hr, and the city’s hard pressed ring road (périphérique)

http://worldstreets.wordpress.com/2014/05/21/paris-to-limit-speeds-to-30-kmhr-over-entire-city/

David Adjaye at Design Indaba 2013

 

David Adjaye, Founder of Adjaye Associates

David Adjaye, Founder of Adjaye Associates

Dezeen and MINI World Tour: we speak to architect David Adjaye, fresh off the stage from his presentation at Design Indaba, about his relationship with Africa and why he believes the continent provides a great opportunity for architects.

Adjaye was born in east Africa, to Ghanaian parents, before moving to London at 14. He explains that, after graduating from the Royal College of Art, he felt the need to return to the continent where he grew up.

“I wanted to revisit the continent of Africa” he explains, “but I wanted to revisit it, not through the lens of my parents or through any kind of formal experience, tourism or anything. I wanted to claim it for my own.”

He spent 11 years, from 1999 to 2010, visiting the capital city of each country on the continent “to try to understand the nature of the cities in Africa, to understand their past and their present, to understand their history and their geography.”

Through this research, which was published as a seven-volume book, Adjaye realised the importance of Africa’s unique geography. “It became clear to me that the political map of Africa that we have is a very difficult way to understand the continent,” he says. “Fundamentally, the way we should be looking at it is through geography.”

Adjaye created his own map of the continent, divided into six distinct geographic zones, which, he believes, have shaped African culture. “In these [zones], all the civilisations of Africa have manifested themselves,” he says. “Their unique identities come from that, the artefacts of the continent reflect that geography.”

This realisation was important to Adjaye’s own approach to architecture. “I wanted to create a blueprint for how I wanted to work on the continent,” he explains. “I didn’t just want to make contemporary architecture with the usual references of anonymous abstracts and global things, I wanted to find a way of making architecture that could take onboard issues that are big, but also specific enough to make unique objects.”

Adjaye believes that, despite the continent’s considerable problems, Africa presents a great opportunity for architects. “GDP growth over the last decade is anything between 10 and 15 percent, which is extraordinary. It’s greater than what China was doing,” he explains. “This economic drive is changing the political paradigm because as people are becoming more wealthy they are starting to question politically their structure.

“What’s amazing is that, unlike working in Europe or America at the moment, [as an architect] in Africa you can try to ascribe a new paradigm. If you get the right political agency and the right construction environment, you can make extraordinary moments in architecture. That for me is very exciting.”

http://vimeo.com/dezeen/mini-world-tour-cape-town-david-adjaye-africa-architecture

Turning waste into building blocks of the future city

Cities were invented for a multitude of purposes. First was the need for the concentration of vital resources in a given region – then came their role as places for worship, trade, governmental control and military defence. But in our modern age, urban spaces were conceived and shaped primarily around mass market industrialisation.

Today the consequences of the post-industrial city have had an incredible impact on the environment. It is widely accepted cities impinge on areas well beyond their borders. Waste streams in cities are the leading factor in pollution of the areas outside their geo-political boundaries.

One of Terreform ONE’s plans is to use parts of derelict ships to create a kind of buffer reef to help protect cities from the effect of storms.

One of Terreform ONE’s plans is to use parts of derelict ships to create a kind of buffer reef to help protect cities from the effect of storms.

Urban waste must be reconfigured – our time has run out. Reports of garbage problems from Naples in Italy to Beijing in China underscore the size of the problem. Landfills are filled and incinerators have the potential to release poisons such as dioxin. We must have a new strategy towards refuse in urban places, one that includes the design of consumables in the first place. Many concepts exist already, but what are some of the most radical solutions to our wasteful ways?

Recently, the planet reached 400 parts per million of carbon in the atmosphere for the first time since modern humans evolved. Reversing such wasteful habits will require tremendous effort, as minuscule changes will not alter this course. Humanity has reached its peak of one-way consumption.

Now is the time to design waste to regenerate our cities. What are the possibilities for urban environments after our aged infrastructure is recalibrated? How might bigger cities and waste mix? One key idea is that waste is not recycled through infrastructural mechanisms but instead up-cycled in perpetuity.

All over the globe municipal waste is on the rise. In China, the amount of municipal solid waste produced is rising by 6% per year. It has kept pace with the rapid urbanization in China. Many parts of South America are also rapidly urbanising and their waste has grown with it. Brazilian cities have had a steady 10% increase in waste headed for landfills. India will see a 500% increase in e-waste – materials from cell phones, TVs, refrigerators – destined for urban landfills. A lot of it is imported from developed countries. South Africa and China will also have to deal with 400% more garbage from foreign e-waste.

Mankind will have to solve our waste problem in cities. If we don’t, it’ll be the end of us. There are a number of possible solutions, and some of them are already being adopted.

Currently, waste metals are crushed into cubes, but in the future they could be cut into shapes which could then be used to build structures

Currently, waste metals are crushed into cubes, but in the future they could be cut into shapes which could then be used to build structures

Super-sized waste

The first credible step is to reduce trash by considering the life cycle of objects we make. Things that are designed for obsolescence should be outlawed. Additionally, products must be manufactured with the intent to reuse, disassemble, take back or upcycle.  For instance, instead of tossing out bottles we could adapt them for use as planters, lighting fixtures, building wall elements.

Other cities have highly organised systems to solve these problems. In Zurich, the city requires individuals pay handsomely for waste that is simply discarded, while thorough recycling is encouraged by free citywide collection services. Therefore well over 90% of municipal waste inside Zurich is recycled and sent to incinerators to produce energy. Burning waste is not the answer but it does have opportunities in the mid-term. It requires substantial need for enforceable regulations, comprehensive industry controls, economic feasibility plans, and the latest ultra-expensive technology such as plasma gasification plants.

In similarly developed cities – Malmo, Tokyo, or Copenhagen – it makes sense to use a waste-to-energy processes. These prevailing urban populations are stable and easily taxed to support such a system – not so easy in developing cities such as Lagos or Jakarta.

Outreach programs that invite the public to observe civic waste systems as a spectacle are instrumental in spreading awareness. The Hangzhou Environmental Group in China has over 10,000 tourists a year visiting its landfill facility. Freshkills landfill in New York will be transformed into the largest public park in over 100 years that will showcase engineered nature from waste. Cuba, an island nation that has been cut-off from trade imports, has conserved almost everything through carful recycling of parts – from 1950’s cars to eyeglasses, nothing is wasted.

Methane created by rotting rubbish could be used to power small power stations – creating another end use out of our city waste.

Methane created by rotting rubbish could be used to power small power stations – creating another end use out of our city waste.

Look at how such a system might affect the US. America is the lead creator of waste on the earth, making approximately 30% of the world’s trash and tossing out around three-quarters of a ton per US citizen per year. It seems value has devolved into rampant waste production: mega-products scaled for super-sized franchise brands, big-box retail, XXL jumbo paraphernalia and so on. The US mindset is typifying a throwaway consumer culture. Where does it all end up? Heather Rogers said in her investigative book Gone Tomorrow that throwing things away is unsustainable. The first step we must take is reduction – meaning a massive discontinuation of objects designed for obsolescence. Then we need a radical reuse plan. Our waste crisis is immense. What is our call to action?

New York City is currently disposing of nearly 33,000 tons of waste per day. Previously, most of this discarded material ended up in Fresh Kills on Staten Island, before operations were blocked. Manhattan’s inhabitants discard enough paper products to fill the Empire State Building every two weeks. Terreform ONE’s Rapid Re(f)use and Homeway projects strive to capture, reduce and redesign New York’s refuse infrastructure. The initiative imagines an extended city reconstituted from its own junked materials. The concept remakes the city by using all the trash entombed in the Fresh Kills landfill. Theoretically, the method should produce, at minimum, seven new Manhattan Islands. New York City’s premier landfill was started by the divisive urban planner Robert Moses and driven by apathetic workers and machines. Now, guided by a prudent community with smart equipment, we must reshape it.

The West exports some of its waste in the form of junked electronic equipment, which adds to landfill issues in developing countries

The West exports some of its waste in the form of junked electronic equipment, which adds to landfill issues in developing countries

Super-sized waste

The first credible step is to reduce trash by considering the life cycle of objects we make. Things that are designed for obsolescence should be outlawed. Additionally, products must be manufactured with the intent to reuse, disassemble, take back or upcycle.  For instance, instead of tossing out bottles we could adapt them for use as planters, lighting fixtures, building wall elements.

Other cities have highly organised systems to solve these problems. In Zurich, the city requires individuals pay handsomely for waste that is simply discarded, while thorough recycling is encouraged by free citywide collection services. Therefore well over 90% of municipal waste inside Zurich is recycled and sent to incinerators to produce energy. Burning waste is not the answer but it does have opportunities in the mid-term. It requires substantial need for enforceable regulations, comprehensive industry controls, economic feasibility plans, and the latest ultra-expensive technology such as plasma gasification plants.

In similarly developed cities – Malmo, Tokyo, or Copenhagen – it makes sense to use a waste-to-energy processes. These prevailing urban populations are stable and easily taxed to support such a system – not so easy in developing cities such as Lagos or Jakarta.

Outreach programs that invite the public to observe civic waste systems as a spectacle are instrumental in spreading awareness. The Hangzhou Environmental Group in China has over 10,000 tourists a year visiting its landfill facility. Freshkills landfill in New York will be transformed into the largest public park in over 100 years that will showcase engineered nature from waste. Cuba, an island nation that has been cut-off from trade imports, has conserved almost everything through carful recycling of parts – from 1950’s cars to eyeglasses, nothing is wasted.

Paper will have to be recycled more to ease strain on landfills –New York throws out enough to fill the Empire State Building every two weeks.

Paper will have to be recycled more to ease strain on landfills –New York throws out enough to fill the Empire State Building every two weeks.

Look at how such a system might affect the US. America is the lead creator of waste on the earth, making approximately 30% of the world’s trash and tossing out around three-quarters of a ton per US citizen per year. It seems value has devolved into rampant waste production: mega-products scaled for super-sized franchise brands, big-box retail, XXL jumbo paraphernalia and so on. The US mindset is typifying a throwaway consumer culture. Where does it all end up? Heather Rogers said in her investigative book Gone Tomorrow that throwing things away is unsustainable. The first step we must take is reduction – meaning a massive discontinuation of objects designed for obsolescence. Then we need a radical reuse plan. Our waste crisis is immense. What is our call to action?

New York City is currently disposing of nearly 33,000 tons of waste per day. Previously, most of this discarded material ended up in Fresh Kills on Staten Island, before operations were blocked. Manhattan’s inhabitants discard enough paper products to fill the Empire State Building every two weeks. Terreform ONE’s Rapid Re(f)use and Homeway projects strive to capture, reduce and redesign New York’s refuse infrastructure. The initiative imagines an extended city reconstituted from its own junked materials. The concept remakes the city by using all the trash entombed in the Fresh Kills landfill. Theoretically, the method should produce, at minimum, seven new Manhattan Islands. New York City’s premier landfill was started by the divisive urban planner Robert Moses and driven by apathetic workers and machines. Now, guided by a prudent community with smart equipment, we must reshape it.

‘Smart trash’

How could this work? Outsized automated 3-D printers could be modified to rapidly process trash and to complete the task within decades. These potential automatons would be entirely based on existing techniques commonly used in industrial waste compaction devices. To accomplish this job, nothing drastically new needs to be invented. Most technologies are intended to be off-the-shelf. Instead of machines that crush objects into cubes, compaction devices could benefit from adjustable jaws that would craft simple shapes into smart ‘puzzle blocks’ for assembly. The blocks of waste material could be predetermined, using computational geometries, in order to fit domes, archways, lattices, windows, or whatever patterns would be needed. Different materials could serve specified purposes: transparent plastic for fenestration, organic compounds for temporary decomposable scaffolds, metals for primary structures and so on. Eventually, the future city would make no distinction between waste and supply.

If you think this sounds familiar, it is. Think back to the 2008 Pixar animation WALL-E.  At approximately the same time that Rapid R(e)fuse was initiated, the movie was announced. WALL-E’s name is an acronym: Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth Class. Left behind by mankind, he toils with trillions of tons of non-recycled inner-city trash. He tirelessly configures mountains of discarded material. Why pyramids of trash? WALL-E’s daily perpetual feats seem almost futile. The film omits exactly why he is programmed to pile refuse; and there is the shortcoming.

There’s a deeper motivation for stacking refuse. What if the rubbish was refabricated to become real urban spaces or buildings? If it is plausible to adapt current machinery, how much material is available? At first sight, any sanitary landfill may be viewed as an ample supply of building materials. Heavy industrial technologies crush cars or to automatically sort out garbage are readily available. 3-D printing has exhausting capabilities if adjusted to larger scales. This is where Terreform ONE’s city began.

The envisioned city would be derived from trash; not ordinary trash, but ‘smart refuse’. A significant factor of the city composed from smart refuse is ‘post-tuning’ – and we would have to adapt this raw material for use. Integration into the city texture would be a learning process. In time, the responses would eventually become more attuned to the needs of the urban dweller. This new city may be built from trash, but it will also be connected via computers. The buildings blocks will learn.

Cities, unlike machines, are similar to a complex ecology. Ecology is capable of achieving a continuous harmonious state, or even further, a positive intensification. If ecological models are productively everlasting, urban models can logically follow.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20130524-creating-our-cities-from-waste/all

Thomas Edison’s patent for the construction of all-concrete houses

Edison Concrete House

Edison’s idea: a house that could be built with one pour of cement. The process could eliminate not only the traditional work of erecting walls and roof but also much of the labor involved in finishing the interiors. Given the right mold, “stairs, mantels, ornamental ceilings, and other interior decorations and fixtures” would all be formed by the same giant piece of concrete.

 

Post-Hurricane Sandy: Solutions for a Resilient City

Sandy Aftermath

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, as communities band together to clean up the devastation and utility companies work tirelessly to restore the infrastructure that keeps New York City running, planners and policy makers are debating the next steps to making the city as resilient to natural disaster as we once thought it was. We have at our hands a range of options to debate and design and the political leverage to make some of these solutions a reality. The question now is, which option or combination of options is most suitable for protecting New York City and its boroughs? Follow us after the break for more.

 

The event of Hurricane Sandy reminds us that we are not immune to disaster. Lower Manhattan is built precariously on dirt and rock, its most precious assets jutting out into the tides of New York Bay. Hurricane Sandy proved that our infrastructure is not resilient, natural disasters are not biased and that, with our current measures, we are wholly unprepared for a similar occurrence. It’s true that scientists have called Sandy the “Frankenstorm” – a combination of worst case scenarios that turned the Category 1 hurricane into a thousand-diameter monster storm that reaped devastation all along the Atlantic Coast of the Americas. High Tide and a cold front fueled Sandy’s already powerful winds and caused unprecedented storm surges, the likes of which haven’t been seen since the 19th century, along Jamaica Bay across Brooklyn and Queens and Manhattan’s exposed coast.

Here are some suggestions that have been addressed by New York Governor Cuomo, New York City Mayor Bloomberg, and various environmentalists, architects and engineers:

The solution that has gotten the most attention in the past few weeks is the introduction of sea gates into New York Bay. Following in Amsterdam’s footsteps, the sea gates would protect the low lying areas of NYC from flooding by creating a barrier that would stop water from flowing into the rivers during a surge. There are several missteps in this strategy: the sea gates will only protect New York Harbor leaving Jamaica Bay, the Rockaways, and Brighton Beach as exposed as they were during the storm. Many experts agree that this expensive and intrusive solution is not practical for the geography of New York City. Other ideas that have made headlines is a five-mile gateway that would protect parts of Long Island and New Jersey, operating as a series of gates and dikes, similar to a strategy employed in Amsterdam.

But environmental concerns about sea gates and barrier strategies in general have also surfaced. Philip Orton writes in the New York Times that such a move could compromise the ecosystems in the area: “[the] plan that has been presented would reduce exchanges of our city’s estuarine waters with the ocean, degrading water quality and changing temperature and salinity. This would have complex effects on our rebounding ecosystems and coastal fisheries”. If we are to choose, a solution that must be balanced between resilience and sustainability, there must be other options out there. Our modern infrastructure follows a methodology of resistance; our policies and strategies try to control and combat nature. But what we are seeing is that we cannot prepare for every natural disaster without compromising elements of our environment. Many environmentalists agree that a better strategy is to adapt and prepare, working within the realm of nature to protect our cities.”

Manhatten Waterfront Post Sandy

So what solutions are out there? Some architects are devising plans to make the city more adaptable and resilient to such events. Architect Stephen Cassell of Architecture Research Office suggests using nature itself to respond to rising sea levels by extending Manhattan with wetlands that absorb the water and reduce its force as it approaches the city’s streets. Architect and Landscape designer Kate Oroff suggests a similar strategy using reefs and creating habitat for oysters within New York Harbor and off the Brooklyn/Queens coast. Such natural habitats can filter water and mitigate the force of a storm surge in a way that is similar to wetlands.

Small measures such as these have become more viable among planners and designers that can visualize a solution that is within reach and is within a framework of small steps that help protect against disasters and allow a city to rebound much more quickly. Waterproofing utility systems, watertight adaptations to subway entrances, and building codes that ban placing water heaters and electrical systems in cellars, are just a few small scale measures that could have greatly reduced the damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy. Some more extreme suggestions is “managed retreat” which calls for moving people away from coastal areas altogether.

So as engineers, designers and planners, how do we defend ourselves for the next onslaught of unprecedented weather events? For every proposal, there is an argument that warns of its negative impacts and inefficiencies. The solution will likely be a combination of measures, preparedness being a top priority, and will entail collaboration on the part of politicians and scientists, engineers and designers, infrastructure and nature.

http://www.archdaily.com/292417/post-hurricane-sandy-solutions-for-a-resilient-city/

The Danger of the Zoning-Free Approach in Developing Nations

Despite the romantic notion about cities that develop organically have a rich diversity of form and function, we cannot overlook the deadly side effects of negligent city planning. As Christopher Hume of the Toronto Star points out, last month’s tragic fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas is a grim reminder that planning has a time and place and its ultimate utility resides in the initiative to protect residents and make for healthier communities. The tangle of bureaucracy associated with planning, zoning and land use regulations can give any architect or developer a massive headache. In some cases, the laws are so restricting that diverging from bulk regulations becomes very limiting.

WestTX-highres

 

According to Hume, Texas prides itself on having a zoning free policy towards urban development, and while this contributes to its low real estate rates, we cannot ignore the dangerous follies that result from this approach. Surely there is a middle ground. Perhaps it lies in a long overdue overhaul of outdated planning approaches that are more receptive to the kind of development we would like to see in our cities without sacrificing public health.

Plant_Explosion_Texas_Haff__tx728_fsharpen

In many ways, it comes down to economics and real estate values. Profit driven developers will always prioritize income over design. So where do we draw the line between rampant growth, and moderate and considered design? How anarchist can we be about diverging from our zoning codes and planning regulations? How do we determine the boundaries between strict land use regulations and intuitive organic growth?

texas-west-fertilizer-explosion-8

http://www.archdaily.com/368200/the-danger-of-the-zoning-free-approach/

Post-tsunami housing for kirinda, Sri Lanka by Shigeru Ban

It seems that whenever disaster strikes, Shigeru Ban is summoned to the scene to help – and now he is one of 20 designers nominated for the 2013 Aga Khan Award for Architecture. Although Ban could have been recognized for a whole host of humanitarian projects, this year the architect was recognized for designing 100 small homes for Sri Lankan villagers who were displaced after the 2004 tsunami leveled the village of Kirinda.

After consulting with locals about the preferred layout of their new micro homes, Ban designed the 31 square meter homes with a bathroom and kitchen that is separated by the living area. This last stipulation was government driven. In order to help boost the local economy after the tsunami’s wholesale destruction, Ban made use of local labor and materials.

Each of the 100 homes has walls made with earth bricks, while partitions and finishings are comprised of local rubber tree wood. A shared entertainment space is covered, allowing for community activities. The homes are specifically attuned to the local climate and the entire complex has an area of 3,195 square meters.

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